Best Friends Blog
 

No-kill West Valley City

Demonstrating once again that animal welfare knows no political boundaries, a commitment to no-kill has become an electoral plus for an increasing number of city councils.

Not to be left out of the picture, West Valley City, a Salt Lake suburb with a population of 129,000, passed a council resolution in February to go no-kill. Best Friends offered our support to the effort, and we have been meeting with city officials to hammer out a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) as to how Best Friends can most effectively engage with the community to help them realize their no-kill aspirations and identify which programs are going to have the greatest positive impact on shelter numbers. The MOU comes up for a vote today and is expected to pass.

At the same time, the mayor of Taylorsville has also reached out to Best Friends for help in taking the city no-kill. (Taylorsville contracts with West Valley City for animal control services.)

Beginning in 2000, Best Friends launched a statewide campaign to lead Utah to no-kill. It meant stitching together a crazy quilt of rescues and animal control agencies that ranged from the high-population centers in the greater Salt Lake City area to no-stoplight rural communities, where animal control had always been the unwelcome responsibility of a two- or three-person police department. Since that time, over 217,000 dogs and cats have been fixed, and more than 100,000 adopted through what was then No More Homeless Pets in Utah and is now simply Best Friends Animal Society – Utah. In that time, over a dozen communities and jurisdictions have gone no-kill, such as South Salt Lake City, Moab and Ivins, while others like Salt Lake County animal control are knocking on the no-kill door.

In West Valley City, Best Friends expects to move forward with an aggressive campaign to increase adoptions, implement progressive and proven measures to save community cats, and initiate highly targeted spay/neuter programs for low-income residents with financial participation by the city.

While homeless pets don’t vote, standing up for no-kill is a vote-getter for local politicians in the red state of Utah.

 

Julie Castle

 

 

  • Anonymous

    Good news.  

  • kimberly

    Why can’t there be a fine that costs more than the cost of a neuter/spay?

    Breeders can afford this but it is not breeders animals that primarily show up in shelters. A few bad breeders animals do and I have had this argument with many.

    I can search and search across the country and find less than five rescues
    per year of an ocicat, egyptian mau or abysinnian – pure breds that is.
    What gets listed on PETFINDER as pure breds rarely are.
    Even my ocicat rescue was only 1/2 ocicat. It was the owner that took
    the animal home that did not spay.

    My point being the majority of cats and dogs in shelters are mixes.
    And that should be the target for controlling the breeding of
    animals that there are not enough homes for.

    It seems to me that while the shelters are necessary at the same
    time it is in a way enabling irresponsibility.

    KEEP UP THE GOOD WORK PUT PUSH HARDER AT THE TRUE SOURCE.

     

  • kimberly

    Why can’t there be a fine that costs more than the cost of a neuter/spay?

    Breeders can afford this but it is not breeders animals that primarily show up in shelters. A few bad breeders animals do and I have had this argument with many.

    I can search and search across the country and find less than five rescues
    per year of an ocicat, egyptian mau or abysinnian – pure breds that is.
    What gets listed on PETFINDER as pure breds rarely are.
    Even my ocicat rescue was only 1/2 ocicat. It was the owner that took
    the animal home that did not spay.

    My point being the majority of cats and dogs in shelters are mixes.
    And that should be the target for controlling the breeding of
    animals that there are not enough homes for.

    It seems to me that while the shelters are necessary at the same
    time it is in a way enabling irresponsibility.

    KEEP UP THE GOOD WORK PUT PUSH HARDER AT THE TRUE SOURCE.

     

  • kimberly

    Why can’t there be a fine that costs more than the cost of a neuter/spay?

    Breeders can afford this but it is not breeders animals that primarily show up in shelters. A few bad breeders animals do and I have had this argument with many.

    I can search and search across the country and find less than five rescues
    per year of an ocicat, egyptian mau or abysinnian – pure breds that is.
    What gets listed on PETFINDER as pure breds rarely are.
    Even my ocicat rescue was only 1/2 ocicat. It was the owner that took
    the animal home that did not spay.

    My point being the majority of cats and dogs in shelters are mixes.
    And that should be the target for controlling the breeding of
    animals that there are not enough homes for.

    It seems to me that while the shelters are necessary at the same
    time it is in a way enabling irresponsibility.

    KEEP UP THE GOOD WORK PUT PUSH HARDER AT THE TRUE SOURCE.

     

  • DEB1074

    GREAT NEWS! THIS IS THE BEST NEWS I HAVE HEARD TO HELP THESE BEAUTIFUL ANIMALS IN A VERY LONG TIME! 

  • Maria Divirgilio

    Maybe you need to come to New York where animals are killed 7days a week and almost 24 hours a day. Most Animals that enter the animal control never make it out. The biggest breed killed are almost all bully breeds. It’s terrible what happens to these poor animals. Even puppies and pregnant dogs are killed.

  • Placone Willey

    The good works of Best Friends is spreading out of control!!!

  • Mamabaysinger

    God bless you for all you do to save our animals.

  • ParisPoodle

    I wish you could help us here in Fresno, CA.  The SPCA recently told the City Council they would not be interested in renewing their contract.  There had been alot of controversy and public outrage about their kill rate.  Now the City is trying to figure out what to do and seeking help from several animal organizations.  Unfortunately, those animal organizations are not experts like you.  How can Fresno get your help?

  • http://profile.yahoo.com/MB6SZA62PGCCVDDAUEJVT6KMOQ Jackey

    I HAVE ALWAYS LOVED SEEING THIS PROGRESS, I DO NOT THINK THE SOUTHERN STATES WILL EVER CATCH UP WHERE I AM   ; (

  • Tlkern

    No-Kill Shelters are a bad idea!  Where I live, the local shelter went No-Kill.  Now they have a kennel full of big, mean, unadoptable dogs and sickly cats, and have been unable to accept any adoptable pets in need for months.  As a result, they are getting no income from adoption fees, and many of the pet dogs and cats that would have been surrendered to the shelter are being set loose along country roads to fend for themselves, or are being abandoned to starve or even being shot by their owners who can no longer care for them.  No-Kill looks good on paper, and if the organization adopting it is a large, well-funded operation with the ability to foster and rehabilitate pets, it can work, but most small, regional shelters are ill-equipped for such an altruistic approach to serving the community’s unwanted pets.  Don’t be swayed by the rhetoric of the Animal Rights folk.  Think about it.  This is not serving pet owners or their pets in most communities; it is serving the political agendas of politicians who are already in the back pockets of the ARs.

  • Wendyp1

     What????  Killing animals is never in the best interest of anyone.  How about you make a donation and maybe spread the word and get involved somehow?  Politicians in the back pockets of animal rights?  Who are you???

  • Wendypark

    That is such awesome news. Thank you for all of your good works!!

  • http://profile.yahoo.com/MB6SZA62PGCCVDDAUEJVT6KMOQ Jackey

    I KNOW MARIA WHY CANT WE ALL BE NO KILL IF IT WORKS OTHER PLACES THEN WTF I DON’T UNDERSTAND! I AM STUNK IN THE INBRED SOUTH WHERE THEY WILL NEVER CATCH UP!

  • http://profile.yahoo.com/MB6SZA62PGCCVDDAUEJVT6KMOQ Jackey

    HOW ABOUT WE EUTH PPL WHO MISTREAT ANIMALS!! I WILL BE A FULL TIME VOLUNTEER  ; )

  • Jmuhjacat

    This is wonderful, and I applaud both Best Friends’ worthy efforts and the decisions by all municipalities concerned to go “no-kill”.  However, this nation is a long, LONG way from even dreaming of truly being no-kill.  With that in mind, I go to my work as a crossposter/tagger/rescue contactor on behalf of the incarcerated cats of NYACC, which I do 365 days a year on social media.  Please join me.

  • Jody

    Awesome commitment West Valley City! More cities, towns and states need to fall in-line with the campaign for “no-kill” and “no more homeless pets!” It can be done but it takes effort and commitment from the community and its leaders. Again, congratulations!! “The greatness of a nation and its moral progress can be judged by the way its animals are treated!” ~ Gandhi

  • JC

     Absolutely! There would be a lot of people volunteering to do unto the abusers as they have done unto the animal ~ and there would be no tears or heartache. We would all sleep very well at night!

  • SpaceGirl

    I think there is a way for a shelter or group of shelters to become No-Kill without having kennels full fo mean, unadoptable or sick animals and to be able to continue to accept pets, but it’ll take a lot of brainstorming.  I don’t think it’s impossible, though.

    There’s a shelter in my area that isn’t no-kill, but the amount of animals they kills is less than many other shelters in the area because they rent out a space in the mall, and they sell pets from their shelter there.  It’s so popular, they’re hoping to open a few more in different nearby cities.  I don’t know the figures, but they make their profit mostly from the stuff that they sell.  Sure, like any shelter, they charge an adoption fee; but they also sell supplies like food, litterboxes, litter, puppy pads, collars, leashes, toys so that if you adopt the pet, you also buy supplies for the pet as well.  The prices are about the same as the same items you would get at Petsmart or Petco; only instead of someone making a profit from this, after paying for wholesale costs, rent, and hourly employees (it’s mostly volunteer-run, though), the rest of the money goes back to the shelter.  If a shelter can’t afford to rent out a space, I think they could make more of a profit to go back into the animals by selling supplies, and maybe by doing fundraisers (anything as simple as bake sales and garage sales – which costs very little to set up - to auctions and fundraising events).

    So anyway, my point is, you could achieve lower kill or no-kill by doing something like that.  Other ideas include having a foster program.  Most shelters have foster programs, but to my knowledge, the fosters only take the animals to young or small to be adopted out, animals that are too sick, or ones with behavior problems (yes, I have seen this), and then they’re sent back to the shelter once they’re old enough, or well, or whatever.  Instead, a foster should have the option of keeping the animal until it’s adopted out.  The shelter can hold adoption fairs where fosters can bring the animals that are in foster care instead of the shelter, and they can advertise on Craigslist and Petfinder. 
    I know many people who foster cats for a certain rescue in my area, and while they have criterion on who to or not to adopt out to, they’re not too picky, and most kittens are adopted out within weeks, and adults are adopted out within a few months.  100% of these cats are in foster care, being taken care of and loved on, instead of sitting in a cage at some shelter.  None of these fosters are getting paid.  The incentive for doing this is that they love cats.  Shelters could do this, too, in order to take on more animals and kill less. 

    I honestly don’t think most people knew about fostering.  I love cats, but call me ignorant, I knew nothing about fostering cats until about two years ago.  I never heard of such a thing.  I think if we educate the public about doing this, more people will step up and do it.

    Anyway, I didn’t intend for this to be a novel.  But I personally believe that a shelter can become lower kill or no-kill by doing the things I mentioned, and by brainstorming of more things.  However, it would take a lot of organization and planning to do so.

  • Chieftain8

    I would like a definition of no-kill? What do these shelters do with a 15 year old large breed dog who is no longer able to support itself due to advance arthritis that is non responsive to medication? What do these shelters do with an aged cat with mammary gland cancer with neoplastic tissue exposed and necrotic? What do these shelters do with a vicious dog that has killed a neighbors pet and attacked a child with no proven provocation? Only looking for a simple explaination..

  • http://www.facebook.com/amy.howland.37 Amy Howland

    There is a group of us in Hillsborough County, FL fighting VERY hard to prevent our county animal shelter from becoming no-kill.  Our group is comprised of all-volunteer, non-profit rescues – pure breed dog rescues, mixed breed rescues, cat rescues, a bird rescue and a couple people who love animals and do not want to see the no-kill/pro-suffering movement take over what a fantastic shelter.  We are all people who, in one way or another, have passionately dedicated our time, energy and money to helping unwanted animals.  If “no-kill” could be done in a responsible way, we would be all for it, but none of us have seen any comprehensive plan which is in any way responsible and what we have seen is disastrous.  The examples we keep getting fed are Manatee County Animal Services and Austin, TX.  However, Manatee significantly curtails intake, Austin is overcrowded and giving away animals FREE, Austin sent out a plea for a puppy exposed to PARVO being put in the general population because the sick ward was full, and Manatee just announced they are doing the same – any animal in their facility who has been there OVER 90 DAYS IS FREE!  Anybody in real rescue knows the cardinal sin is to give away an animal for free.  I never thought the fight of my life would be for a kill shelter, but here I am.  That’s how bad the no-kill philosophy is.

  • Anonymous

    No kill involves animals that have a quality of life including older animals.  If there is no hope for a quality of life for the older animal who may be in severe pain due to cancer or arthritis or if the dog shows signs of aggression but is beyond rehabilitation or any animal that has no hope of recovery or hope for a quality of life would be humanely euthanized.  I think that is my understanding of what no kill means.  I could be wrong but I think that is Best Friends philosophy.  They will do whatever they can for the animal but if there is no hope of reducing the suffering of an animal, whether it be due to old age problems or cancer they will euthanize the animal as the compassionate act.  They are able to take in aggressive dogs and work with them permanently to help an animal with aggression problems but I understand in a shelter situation that would be dealt differently.  If there are rescues that have experience with an aggressive dog then they can pull that said dog and help it.  Nothing is perfect but I fully agree with more controlled and limited breeding of all cats and dogs by responsible, reputable breeders to reduce the overall population, spaying and neutering all other dogs and cats and expanding the foster program, and helping some groups to become a sanctuary themselves to help those animals that are harder to adopt have a quality place to stay (following in the footsteps of the Best Friends model) until they are adopted, other programs that train some of these dogs to be therapy dogs, search and rescue dogs, dogs to help the handicapped, police dogs, etc.  Like I said, nothing is perfect but what Best Friends and other people are trying to do to go in that direction is wonderful.  Educating people, especially kids about what reckless breeding of dogs and cats will result in, the needless suffering and death of perfectly wonderful animals.  Educating people, especially kids about what it means to commit to an animal for its lifetime and what happens if they don’t.  I think over time with so many people trying out and using all these avenues eventually things will get better and there will be less unwanted animals.  You have to start somewhere and that is what Best Friends and other people are doing.  Certainly don’t save an animal if you are going to just warehouse it.  We need to do more than just warehouse animals.  I think it will take a while but if we don’t start now and keep pushing for these necessary changes we will prolong the needless suffering of innocent animals. 

  • SpaceGirl

    My definition of no-kill – and I’m sure some people won’t agree with me – is not killing any HEALTHY animal, or an animal that can be treated and then leave a normal, healthy life following treatment.  I also believe that you can be no-kill but still euthanize unhealthy animals; “unhealthy” meaning having a terminal illness or traumatic injury in which treatment would prolong the life but also the suffering of the animal.  I don’t think that an animal should have to suffer, and in those cases, euthanization is better.

    So, for example, kitty falls out of a two-story building.  Owner brings kitty to vet and tells owner that the bones in both legs are broken (some parts shattered), but that with extensive surgery and the insertion of rods into the legs where the shattered bits are, the kitty can live a normal, pain-free life.  While the surgery would be both extensive and expensive, the kitty would live a long and healthy life, and would no longer be in pain after healing from the procedure.  In those cases, I do not believe in euthanasia.  I know of a cat rescue in my area who had recently rescued a cat like this.  The kitty has healed, and he can run, jump, and play like he used to.  Now, since I’m not the kitty, I cannot tell you whether or not he feels pain… but all the signs that he exhibited before, when he was having pain, are gone, and he seems to be a happy cat.

    In your examples of the cat with mammary gland cancer and the dog with severe arthritis, I would agree with euthanasia, if it’s apparent that the animal is suffering, and the vet says that medication would only prolong their suffering, it only relieves a small amount of the pain, or it zonks them out.  I may think differently if the medication seems to help… but if the animal, after taking the medication, still appears to be in pain and there’s nothing more the vet can do, then I would euthanize.

    I don’t know what most no-kill shelters do with vicious dogs that have attacked or killed children or other animals.  I think that may be one of the few cases (other than being terminally ill) where they agree to euthanize, but I could be wrong.  I know some – but not all; probably very few - are sent to Dog Town in Utah, where they attempt to rehabilitate them.  Some are adopted out after rehabilitation; and the ones that can’t be rehabilitated remain alive, at Dog Town.

  • dogglover

    These are not ” Animal Rights folks”! Animal Rights is concerned with better environments for farm animals, mainly, e.g. conditions for egg-laying chickens, dairy cattle, etc.  No-kill shelters are dedicated to dogs and cats and to preserving their lives and re-homing them.  I live in a small town of appx 5000, and am a member of a no-kill rescue.  We have been no-kill for 3 years, and have only about 5 active members.  But through the efforts of our dedicated rescue members and fosters, we have been able to do it.  It requires work, and that’s where many people fail the animals… they don’t want to put out any work.  I don’t mean this a person attack, but I do not think that you have any first-hand knowledge of the subject you wrote about.  If you were someone who’d actually put out the effort to get involved and try to make a difference in the lives of unwanted, homeless animals, rather than just cry “we can’t!” or “I can’t!” or “You can’t!” you’d see that no-kill shelters and re-homing the animals (rather than having a shelter full of unadoptables, as you erroneously suggest is the norm, can be successful! It simply requires educating the public and changing the mindset of what shelters are about.  And a whole lot of work to save these precious lives whose only purpose is to bring comfort and love to their humans.  This has nothing to do with politics!

  • dogglover

    The cardinal sin in real rescue is to kill just to make things more convenient for humans.  There can be responsible adoptions for FREE if screening is properly done.  Come on, Amy… you are failing the animals and your fellow rescuers.  I am one of them.

  • dogglover

    Thanks for your thoughtful post!  Someone who is actually considering how to solve the problem, and who thinks there could be a solution, rather than automatically saying it’s impossible!

  • dogglover

    You have got a good head on your shoulders, woman… you are a benefit and friend to the animals.  Thanks for voicing an opinion that makes perfect sense.

  • Lillehammer

    No Kill is defined as a 90% or higher save rate.  No one is talking about adopting out aggressive dogs or terminally ill animals.  This is a misconception.  It is about maximizing lifesaving opportunities.  The standard knee-jerk reaction of killing shelter animals because that’s the way it’s always been done is wrong.  People are afraid of change, afraid of having to step up and do more work, afraid of their shelters being scrutinized, and possibly their jobs being on the line.  Don’t be afraid of change.  Look at the hundreds of shelters across the US that have already implemented the standards to make their shelters No Kill.  If there are problems, or questions, help is out there.  The No Kill Advocacy Center has tons of statistics and info available.  There is a list of criteria a shelter would follow before euthanizing an animal.  Euthanizing would be the last resort. Communities need to step up and take responsibility for these animals and give them a fair chance to live out their lives in a loving home. Isn’t that all the animals are asking of us?

  • Monica Mestas

    Are there templates for a city council resolution?  And is the Memorandum of Understanding available?  Re:  Educating and engaging the public and shelters in the No-Kill movement.  Thank you from Lake Elsinore, CA.

  • Minimuttsnmeows

    fyi when I ran a rescue, ALL of my pets were listed as mixes even those I knew to be purebred. WHY? Because some psycho  will do a dna test and sue if it doesn’t come up correctly. This happened to a fellow rescuer. She ended up  refunding the adoption fee and court costs.
    btw the owner did not want to give up the pet, just wanted to prove a point!
       

  • Minimuttsnmeows

    you have a huge task on your hands! good luck!

  • GVPC

     If no-kill is managed well it should not leave a shelter full of unadoptable dogs. The term “no-kill’ means different things to different rescuers. To most it means no healthy adoptable animal is euthanized for space. To others it means no animal is euthanized for any reason other than serious illness that cannot be corrected.
    The real problem is not the “no-kill” movement, the problem is humans who don’t change and continue to breed pets and refuse to spay/neuter their animals. Many of these people who have nowhere to go with a pet usually have some pretty lame reasons for why they need to get rid of it.
    Killing millions of animals every year is not acceptable either!

  • GVPC

     Seriously? Wow. Sorry you feel its better to kill. :(
    So, we just keep killing millions every year so its convenient for the humans? That is unacceptable.

  • shirley hofmann

    finally….

  • Rentz

    God will surely have crowns in Heaven for all those who help His precious creatures.  Please help in my town Moultrie, GA   The Moultrie/Colquitt Co. Humane Society.  They are NOT a no-kill shelter.  Please, please help..if I had the resources I would make that shelter a no-kill facility.  I have 12 rescue pets of my own.  You do such a wonderful job, please help.

  • Bastet56

    I have 2 wonderful cats from this shelter

  • Ej

    Let’s all be honest with one another. The use of the words no-kill shelter and kill shelter are to place a wedge between the two in the eyes of the naive public for the almighty dollar. Does no-kill really mean no? As stated many times below, animals that are suffering and in pain etc. etc. are humanely euthanized which is a much better term but the word kill evokes the emotions of people. Telling it like it is, is the best policy rather than hiding behind the no-kill moniker making  many believe the no-kill advocates are lilly white. Make it clear in your no-kill mission statement that  no-kill means we will not humanely euthanize adoptable animals. Isn’t it time to get rid of the no-kill phrase anyway and replace it with something more humane like humane euthanasia or mercy euthanasia. Let’s stop fooling people and tell the truth and that the so-called no-kill shelters are like the thousands of other shelters who only euthanize unadoptable animals but choose not to hide behind the no-kill banner.  

  • RITA ALEXANDER

    love this i dont understand y there kill these help less animals whae you get put in a shelter its a death sentance the folks that work there dont care to them its just a job killing an animal dont even bother them just give it a shot then throw it in the trash if i find a stray i will keep it i have 13 all ready all spay and net i dont no y they call it a shelter its  a death sentance best friends  aspa nouth shore thank you for what you do they dont have a voice we have to speak for them

  • s9295

    I am with a shelter in Indiana – is the definition of no-kill trylu 90% save rate or higher?  I am looking for some research and backing on who sets that definition.  Our save rate for 2011 was 96%.  We are currently tracking at about 95% for 2012. I am also looking for resources on working to rehabilitate our animal aggressive dogs, since that seems to be where a problem lies.  Thanks! 

  • Gabi

    We are “A New Beginning Animal Rescue, Inc.” located here in Utah.  I founded ANBAR almost 5 years ago and we are now close to 2000 rescues (re-homed) animals.  We are “No-Kill”, which means, we don’t kill an animal because we had it for a long time or because it has “issues”.  “No-Kill” means never to kill an animal that would have a good quality of life.  If an animal is suffering because of illness or injury that can not be cured, we will euthanize the animal, we will not allow anyone to suffer.

    Even though 2000 rescues might not sound so much, one also has to look at this from a different point of view, these are also 2000 animals that will not reproduce, because they are all spayed and neutered through our program.

    I know that there are many organizations out like ours, small but steady.  I believe that we and these other groups could do so much more if we had some educational help especially for fund raising.  Bake-sales and garage-sales are ok, but I am talking about fund raising on the big scale.

    I would like to put the word out to Best Friends to consider offering free seminars to rescues which would help us to grow and do what we are so passionate about – SAVING ANIMALS!

    Gabriele H. Johnson, Director
    A New Beginning Animal Rescue, Inc.

  • Vwehmueller

    I admire, respect & love Best Friends!! I really wish you could actually spread “No-Kill” across ALL the land, the entire United States, not just Utah. If you can succeed there, why not everywhere!? The human race needs to own up to all the animal “problems & issues” that we’ve caused! 

  • Guest1

    YOU ARE NOT HELPING THE WEST VALLEY ANIMAL SHELTER! YOU GAVE $250,000 TO WEST VALLEY ANIMAL SHELTERS (W NO REGULATIONS) TO SHUT DOWN THE GAS CHAMBER AND ITS STILL RUNNING GASING THE ANIMALS!!!!!! YOU ARE LIARS AND SHOULD BE ASHAMED! THE TRUTH WILL COME OUT

  • TAZ

    THANK GOD FOR PEOPLE LIKE YOU

  • jim rand

    Thank  you so  much for all that your team is doing to establish   NO KILL policies in the state of Utah. I wish  you could help  in the blue state of Wshington especially in the  north  Puget Sound area. I am willing to help in any way I can.  Thank you  Best friends. You are the greatest
    Jim Rand  PhD

  • Very Disappointed Supporter

    West Valley City has only agreed to an 80% live release rate. Also, they refuse to stop using their gas chamber. 

    It is great that fewer animals will killed in West Valley City in the next few years than have been killed previously. But WVC has not shown that it has any genuine interest in being no kill. 
    Surely there are other under-funded Utah cities that truly deserve the boost to their efforts that $250,000 could give them. It would have been nice if Best Friends had given some of them some help, instead of using their resources and funding to help politicians (who have shown absolutely NO interest in saving animals, until now) save their seats.  

    Best Friends knows what the definition of no kill is, and what the standards are for being no kill. And Best Friends should have had the guts to stand up for the principles they were founded on, and refuse to go forward unless WVC agreed to phase out the use of the gas chamber.  

    This partnership, while it may be more visible than working with smaller city shelters, does not make Best Friends look good.

  • A Disappointed Supporter

    The “cardinal sin in rescue” is to send an animal to a bad home. If the animal goes to a good home (i.e. one where it will be cared for, valued, and loved) what difference does it make whether or not the new owners got the animal for free?

    No-kill can, and is, being done in a responsible way. However, reaching that goal requires the active support and participation of everyone in the community – shelters, rescues, politicians, and the public. 

  • Ellen
  • rita alexander

    i have been to a so called shelter they kill animals every day of the week  i just happend to be there giving donations  i found out they where going to kill a small skin  and bone rat terrier  i asked will they give her to me they did i  have hade her for 14 years they did not even give her a chance to be adopted im glad i was there that day she went to heaven 4 yrs ago going toa shelter is a death sentance thats the way i see it i do not hide behind a no kill banner i have a pit bull they wood kill here as soon as she hit the shelter  by the way she is a rescueand as sweet as she can be

  • Missgoodie2shoes

    forever humans should have  to step up and take responsibility for anything that happens to these animals, it is a humans fault they multiply, starve, stray, abused then caged to die at no fault of their own! Give them a
    fair chance to live out their lives in a loving home. Isn’t that all the
    animals